Marci Shore

Marci Shore teaches European cultural and intellectual history at Yale University. Before joining Yale’s history department, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University‘s Harriman Institute; an assistant professor of history and Jewish studies at Indiana University; and Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies at Yale.  She is the author of Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation's Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (Yale University Press, 2006) and the translator of Michal Glowinski‘s Holocaust memoir The Black Seasons (Northwestern University Press, 2005). Currently she is at work on two studies: The Self Laid Bare, an examination of the central European encounters occasioned by phenomenology and structuralism in the first decades of the twentieth century; and The Taste of Ashes (forthcoming from Crown), an account of Eastern Europe’s grappling with its memories of  totalitarianism at that century’s end.  

 

Among her articles and essays are “Czysto Babski: A Women's Friendship in a Man's Revolution” and “Engineering in the Age of Innocence: A Genealogy of Discourse Inside the Czechoslovak Writer's Union, 1949-1967,” in East European Politics and Societies; “Children of the Revolution: Communism, Zionism, and the Berman Brothers” in Jewish Social Studies; “Conversing with Ghosts: Jedwabne, Zydokomuna, and Totalitarianism” in Kritika: Explorations of Russian and Eurasian History; “Tevye’s Daughters: Jews and European Modernity” in Contemporary European History; “When God Died: Symptoms of the East European Avant-Garde-and of Slavoj Zizek” in Slovo a smysl/Word and Sense: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Theory and Criticism in Czech Studies; and “Man liess sie nicht mal ein paar Worte sagen,” in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

 

 

Published work

The Taste of Ashes (forthcoming from Crown)